GA State Parks and
Historic Sites

Georgia has over sixty state parks and historic sites with attractions ranging from ancient Native American markers to Revolutionary and Civil War battlegrounds to mountain nature trails to lake side beaches. Below are pictures of the ones I've had a chance to visit. More about the others here: http://gastateparks.org/parks/

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Amicalola Falls State Park and Lodge (Dawsonville): The tallest cascade in GA also has one of the more expansive visitors areas. Here you see a close-up of the top of the falls. Amicalola Falls State Park and Lodge (Dawsonville): The eastern side trails of Amicalola offer a nice overview of the mountains that are especially nice in fall. Tallulah Gorge State Park (Tallulah Falls): The magnificent gorge at Tallulah Falls is quite impressive both in the rare instances when the white water is open or when closed so visitors can walk on the canyon floor. Here you can see people on one of the many overlooks in the park. Dahlonega Gold Museum Historic Site (Dahlonega): Dahlonega was the site of the Georgia mountain's gold rush and this museum details that history. The building itself has a gold cap mined right from the region. Sweetwater Creek State Park (Lithia Springs):Sweetwater Creek State Park is a large natural area west of Atlanta that follows along the calmly flowing stream. It has trails, boating, and even the remains of an old Civil War era factory. Here you can see some folks enjoying a canoe paddle among the swans on the lake there. Sweetwater Creek State Park (Lithia Springs):Sweetwater Creek State Park is a large natural area west of Atlanta that follows along the calmly flowing stream. It has trails, boating, and even the remains of an old Civil War era factory. Here you can see part of the old factor wall, still left there after it was destroyed by Union Soldiers during the war. Sweetwater Creek State Park (Lithia Springs):Sweetwater Creek State Park is a large natural area west of Atlanta that follows along the calmly flowing stream. It has trails, boating, and even the remains of an old Civil War era factory. You can even walk out onto some of the large rock shoals in the middle of the creek. Dahlonega Gold Museum Historic Site (Dahlonega): Dahlonega was the site of the Georgia mountain's gold rush and this museum details that history. Here you see some of the old gold panning equipment on display. New Echota Historic Site (Calhoun): New Echota was the site that the Cherokee Indians set up as their seat of modern government in the 1800s with homes, farms, schools, and the first native language newspaper. Though successful for a time, the US government eventually forcefully relocated their whole people from New Echota (making it one of the starting points of the "Trail of Tears") and nothing remains of the original site other than a mission house. With the area now a historic site, however, some of the old town has been restoried or other Cherokee historic buildings reloacted to make a nice visit. Here you see the Vann Tavern, a Cherokee owned hotel and store that was relocated from another area in Georgia to show the types of buildings New Echota once held. Etowah Indian Mounds Historic Site (Cartersville):The most historic of Georgia's historic areas, the mounds of the Etowah Indians are some of the most important examples of Mississippian Native American Culture from 1000 to 1550 AD. The mound seen here (Mound B)would have been used for ceremony and chiefly dwellings centuries ago. Etowah Indian Mounds Historic Site (Cartersville):The most historic of Georgia's historic areas, the mounds of the Etowah Indians are some of the most important examples of Mississippian Native American Culture from 1000 to 1550 AD. These figures are examples of important historical artifacts that have been excavated there and are on display at the small but very nice museum on site. New Echota Historic Site (Calhoun): New Echota was the site that the Cherokee Indians set up as their seat of modern government in the 1800s with homes, farms, schools, and the first native language newspaper. Though successful for a time, the US government eventually forcefully relocated their whole people from New Echota (making it one of the starting points of the "Trail of Tears") and nothing remains of the original site other than a mission house. With the area now a historic site, however, some of the old town has been restoried or other Cherokee historic buildings reloacted to make a nice visit. Here you see some old Cherokee owned farm buildings much like would have originally been there. Red Top Mountain State Park (Acworth): Red Top Mountain State Park is just one of many nature park areas around huge Lake Allatoona. Like some of the other city and other parks, it has lake access, picnic areas, and trails. Here you see a view from the park of Bethany Bridge which spans part of the lake. Tallulah Gorge State Park (Tallulah Falls): The magnificent gorge at Tallulah Falls is quite impressive both in the rare instances when the white water is open or when closed so visitors can walk on the canyon floor. The visitor's center can be seen here above the open falls below. Fort Yargo State Park (Winder): Named after the old fort still sitting on the grounds of the park, the main attraction of Fort Yargo is the large lake where you can go fishing, paddling, or have a picnic and swim at the nice beach area. The sand they've put in at the lake side makes for a pleasant area to play and cool off in the summer. Fort Yargo State Park (Winder): Named after the old fort still sitting on the grounds of the park, the main attraction of Fort Yargo is the large lake where you can go fishing, paddling, or have a picnic and swim at the nice beach area. You can rent paddle boats like this one as well as canoes and other boats to enjoy on the water. Moccasin Creek State Park (Clarkesville): A nice RV campground that sits on Lake Burton and is beside the north Georgia fish hatchery, this park is also close to a trail to walk to Hemlock Falls.